We are fully convinced that in some chromosome of the DNA of this young graphic designer and plastic artist from Madrid, there exists some coded information in geometric forms that have paved the way to allow her to stand out in a discipline as broad as the world of graphic art. Otherwise, it is hard to explain how her language, essentially based on unconventional polygons in her ambiguous works, between a clear abstraction tinged with figurative flat colours, draws so much of our attention.

Based on a speciality regarded by many to be ephemeral, her different artistic proposals are based on a solid academic education that understands and is nourished by the multifaceted vision of a bold interior designer, the rationality of an exacting student and the emotional gaze of the brushstrokes of the Fine Arts, disciplines that she explored during her student years. “It wasn’t until the Faculty of Fine Arts when I discovered graffiti, an artistic manifestation that departs almost completely of the tenets of perfect art and that opened a door that was completely unknown to me. It was like entering another world”.

It was then, in the late 90s, when street art, once marginal and reserved for the language of protest, became more visible with a different formalism and with a somewhat more ordered perspective. Aesthetic approaches emerged that diverged from what had previously been done in graffiti, and a new method of communication appeared. “Our work during those early days (which was done in tandem with a French boyfriend who signed with the tag El Tono and Nuria), was one of intervention, without any prior intent of destruction and with which we wanted to integrate our work in the façades and walls of the street.

We partly did it to impose our will and to create a new, more interesting line of dialogue. I’ve always thought that this kind of street art, better looking and with geometric forms, reaches the public better than the typical, more radical forms of graffiti. And at the same time, it proved the enormous importance that the medium has for us”.

Nuria laughs as she recalls those early years when the police asked for identification when they discovered her painting on the wall of an abandoned shop and she, without putting up any kind of resistance, gave them all her details without protest and tried to convince the authorities that this intervention would enrich the run-down areas of the city. “Years later, I had serious problems with this issue because I invented a master key to open the illuminated advertising frames around the city. I removed the big brand advertising campaigns and replaced them with my own pieces, in a period when I was doing origami, for example”.

“I’ve always thought that this kind of street art, better looking and with geometric forms, reaches the public better than the typical, more radical forms of graffiti”.

Afterwards everything happened quite smoothly and things happened in a way that was almost spontaneous and natural, without needing to knock on too many doors. It was a time in which, for example and almost by chance, she saw how some pieces created for the street were hung on the walls of the newly opened Moriarty gallery. “My entry into the world of galleries was somewhat casual. Tono and I were painting on a street in Madrid and a couple approached us who said what we were doing caught their eye. They told us they were about to open a new gallery and they wanted to include us in a collective exhibition of emerging artists”.

Detail of color and fabric of the Gunta rug model.
Textile tests of carpets for the DAC firm.

And as the years went by, the art of Nuria Mora evolved, her production grew and she undertook more, and the organic forms, the plant details, became part of her iconography and combined in new projects – collections of wallpapers, scarves, posters, guides, postcards, rugs, installations, sculptures, gloves, serigraphs… And most recently, in ceramic pieces and a jewellery collection.

 “Every time I need a change in activity, I like to work with people, collaborate with others and experiment with completely diverse things. The thing is, with so many different activities it’s been over a year since I last painted on the street illegally”.

“I’m fascinated by ceramics. This happens with lots of things that I don’t know about and I find I need to know everything. Above all, because I’m a “diversifier”, I want to do lots of different things, I’m very restless and many things grab my attention all at once. The best part of my job is that I am fortunate enough to work how I want and with who I want.” However, this multiple work means she only makes a few units of each project. Partly because she does not believe in serialised work, and also because the piece becomes revalued. “Every time I need a change in activity, I like to work with people, collaborate with others and experiment with completely diverse things. The thing is, with so many different activities it’s been over a year since I last painted on the street illegally”.

Exhibition “Drishti” at the Galería Patricia Amorcida, in Milan.

Solo show at CEART, Madrid.

“Plates Tectónicas”, an exhibition for We Collect Club, in Madrid.

Next up: a small retrospective book that will take a look back at her artistic production. “I really want to do this book because there’s been nothing done on my work and I’m very excited,” she says.
As you know, we can’t wait to see what she’ll surprise us with next.

Collection of jewels, a collaboration with the designer Helena Rohner.

Materials and work tools.

Photos: Nuria Mora

www.nuriamora.com

This article is also available in Español