“I do drawings.” This concise message is on the website of young Catalan illustrator José Antonio Roda, in the + info section to discover a little more about his work. A simple message, clear and no frills, especially because his work already has enough composure that it can be identified when we see one of his illustrations.

He confesses that he does not believe in labels nor in stagnation within his profession, especially because his is an evolution that looks towards the future; a future that changes with the passage of days, with the arrival of new projects and a tomorrow in which he trusts completely. This security is also felt in his work, pieces full of primary colours which, as he states, begin as a simple spot of colour that gradually give shape to pictures or graphics in which the simple forms an essential part of the final result.

 

“Using the colours that populate my art is not something premeditated. It’s something that just happened, and I do it because I like it a lot. It reminds me of the world of children, the primary, the basic; they’re colours to play with. Perhaps another time I might want to try something new, but so far these are the only colours I imagine and use to create and compose,” says Roda.

José Roda illustrator portrait.
Portraits collection from film actresses, one of his most personal language.

His work also focuses on the paper cut, a meticulous and detailed technique that is done entirely by hand and is very much in fashion in the world of graphic design, looking back to the first samples from China from the 16th century. “It’s very entertaining and it’s had a great influence on my way of illustrating and composing. For me it is one more way of drawing,” says the illustrator.

“Using the colours that populate my art is not something premeditated. It’s something that just happened, and I do it because I like it a lot. It reminds me of the world of children, the primary, the basic; they’re colours to play with”, says the artist.

The best of all this is that Roda incorporates and combines different techniques in the same piece, something that evidently enriches his work. So digital technology and handmade crafts can coexist without problems. “At the end of the day they are only foundations on which to capture the illustration. I wish I had the opportunity to delve into all sorts of techniques and materials. Unfortunately this is not the case,” he says.

Berenar silkscreen, signed and numbered copy.
Black Fashion work.

In any case, this illustrator who one day left Catalonia to move to Madrid, to expand his horizons and try his luck outside his comfort zone, has succeeded in creating a brand and enjoys his work. “Time will tell where this is all going. I’m going to keep drawing, working on projects that I get, adding new products to my online store and have fun while trying to pay my rent and my taxes,” he says.

The designer in front of one of his murals.

Photos: José Roda

www.josearoda.bigcartel.com

Alaska ceramic dish.

This article is also available in Español